Riesling

Riesling is more than just the sweet white wine; it produces some of the most interesting whites on the planet. While Germany has certainly claimed this variety as its own, many countries produce Riesling in a wide variety of styles. The sweet, low-quality wines of the 70’s are gone and a new era of Riesling enthusiasts are met with fantastic quality from all parts of the globe.

Riesling

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Riesling

Styles of Riesling
Riesling can be produced in a wide range of sweetness levels, from dessert sweet to bone dry. Germany produces the widest range of offerings, from light and crisp to syrup like elixirs that stand the test of time. Some of the most historical offerings in the wine world hail from Germany, where the sweet wines of the 16th and 17th century are legendary.

Over the border in Alsace, France, you will find a slightly drier version that can age extremely well. While Alsace produces a wide array of styles, the grand cru wines are another testament to the grape’s hegemony. In the new world, there are pockets of serious producers in almost every notable wine producing country, however, many fail to live up to the pedigree of their French and German counterparts. New Zealand, Australia and the United States all have serious contenders, and it will be interesting to see if the producers of the grape have the will to resist more profitable grape options in the vineyard.

Riesling

Geography
Riesling can be found in every region of Germany, from the chilly northern Ahr region to the balmy southern region of Baden. The Mosel, Rheingau and Rheinhessen river valleys all have history that runs in the many hundreds of years and are benchmarks of quality for the grape. Alsace, France is the Francophile outpost for fine Riesling, having a history inextricably linked to their German cousins.

Austria is serious about their Rieslings and have many historic properties that have been growing this grape for hundreds of years like their German counterparts. Places like the Wachau, Kamptal and Kremstal along the Danube River are legendary for their white wines, having been outposts for Roman legions centuries ago. Italy has some notable plantings, as does Slovenia and many other Eastern European countries. The United States has notable plantings in the pacific northwest, as well as New York State. Australia and New Zealand also boast quality offerings, while it can also be found in South America and South Africa.

Riesling

Selling Riesling
Many people looking for a sweeter offering by the glass turn to the Riesling on a restaurant by glass wine list. However, there are so many different styles of the grape, and the sweetness level of each offering is the key to the great recommendation. There are many reasons why these wines are made in the sweeter style, as the sugar is not only for those drinkers who do not enjoying dry wine. The sweetness balances the acidity and makes for great food pairing wine for certain dishes, keeping the mouthwatering for each bite. Knowing which style you offer on your wine list is important, as there are often various levels of residual sugar left in the wine, pertaining directly to where it is from and who the producer is.

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Selling Riesling
Many people looking for a sweeter offering by the glass turn to the Riesling on a restaurant by glass wine list. However, there are so many different styles of the grape, and the sweetness level of each offering is the key to the great recommendation. There are many reasons why these wines are made in the sweeter style, as the sugar is not only for those drinkers who do not enjoying dry wine. The sweetness balances the acidity and makes for great food pairing wine for certain dishes, keeping the mouthwatering for each bite. Knowing which style you offer on your wine list is important, as there are often various levels of residual sugar left in the wine, pertaining directly to where it is from and who the producer is.